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Fireplaces

The world of shopping for fireplaces can be a little intimidating, but not when you use this handy Fireplaces section. Here you'll find wood-burning, gas-fueled, electric, gel-fueled, and pellet-fueled appliances to suit every home and every set of needs. There are units of every style, every size, and every capability so you can find an appliance that addresses every aspect of your home's comfort. Come check out the best products from the best manufacturers in the industry in a simple and easy-to-understand fashion here in our comprehensive Fireplace selection.
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ASK & ANSWER
By Pamela from Far Hills, NJ on January 28, 2014
Is there such a thing as a combined gas and regular fireplace? I have the feeling it has to be one or the other which, when I think about it, combining them would probably be very dangerous.
Which gas fire place unit would you recommend that looks the most like a real fire?

By Kevin on January 28, 2014

Answer:
You are correct. While there are gas log lighters available for wood appliances, there is no true "dual fuel" appliance. Our Napoleon and Majestic lines both feature very realistic units.

By Brian from Buffalo, NY on January 12, 2013
I have a Martin model BW3645 fireplace. Is this a gas and wood burning fireplace?
By Kevin on January 14, 2013

Answer:
This old Martin fireplace was produced as a solid fuel, wood burning appliance. However, I do see that it features a knock-out for addition of a gas line. As such, you could theoretically add a gas log set to this fireplace with no problem.

By Lowell from Stamford, CT on November 12, 2013
My brick fireplace has a 3/4 inch hole in the center about 3 inches above the top of the fireplace burning area. What is this for? I thought it may be for some kind of emblem or something but now I don't think so.

By Collin on November 12, 2013

Answer:
Usually, the only reason a hole of this size exists in the fireplace is to allow outside combustion air to enter the unit to aid efficiency. However, this inlet is usually located near the bottom of the firebox, rather than the top. Can you tell if the hole leads anywhere or is it just a slight indention? Please advise at your convenience.